Orienting a New Generation: Success from the start

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Karen Rowan, MSN, RN, CNOR, System Nurse Educator, Northwell Health

According to AORN, the average age of an OR nurse is 53, with 68 percent planning to retire by 2022. There are four generations of nurses working together. With a lack of OR education in undergraduate programs, it is up to health systems to develop fellowship programs for new graduate nurses. Nurse educators and managers have created didactic material, but it is up to the baby boomer preceptors to assist in developing the millennial RN fellow’s skill set. Research has shown that baby boomers learn and communicate differently than the millennial preceptee. There is no specialized perioperative preceptor program, leaving many nurses feeling ill-prepared to assume this role. This presentation will discuss strategies to bridge the generational gap and create a cohesive and effective clinical experience for both baby boomer and millennial age groups. We will also discuss the benefits of improved nursing satisfaction, retention and the cost savings resulting from a more effective orientation program.

1 CE CreditJon Riley6